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jimh

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Reply with quote  #16 
I was not familiar with the species OARFISH. Now that we are discussing them, here is a nice photograph of a juvenile oarfish being released back to the ocean in California:

https://images.earthtouchnews.com/media/1951869/oarfish-1_2019-07-01.jpg

That is an incredible fish. The above image shows the fish in detail.

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jimh

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Reply with quote  #17 
Re the trip: to go 85-nautical-miles offshore into the ocean in a single-engine 17-foot boat is a bit unusual. You must have great confidence in the boat and the new engine to undertake that sort of trip.

At 85-nautical-miles offshore, I would expect you would no longer be in range of VHF radio stations on shore. Did you carry any other communication radios with you? Did you carry an EPIRB or a PLB? A satellite telephone?

I love the single-engine legacy E-TEC 225-HP engine that powers my 24-foot boat, but I am not sufficiently comfortable in its reliability to run out 85-nautical-miles from shore by myself. A run like that is incredible to me.

What is the capacity of your boat's fuel tank? Did you carry any extra fuel on this trip?

What sort of fuel economy in nautical-miles-per-gallon was achieved on the 85-nautical-mile run out and back?

My boat has about 70-gallons of useful fuel capacity in its tank, and when running on plane the boat and legacy E-TEC engine produce about 2.5-MPG reliably. That gives me a fuel range of about 175-miles--statute miles. Expressed in nautical miles, that is only 152-nautical miles. I couldn't make an 85-nautical-mile run out and back on-plane unless I carried additional fuel in some Jerry cans (portable gasoline containers, so named because they originated in Germany).

I am interested to hear more about your boat's fuel capacity and the fuel economy achieved with the E-TEC G2 1.9-liter three-cylinder 115 H.O. engine.

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rickmcd53

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Reply with quote  #18 
Jim, the original post in this thread gives some reported fuel use figures. His last trip was 222 nm on 180 liters of fuel.
Statler

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Reply with quote  #19 
Hi Jim 

yes some trip - but from what I understand not usual for fishers who live along the Great Barrier Reef. 

in one of the posted photos there is a deck photo showing 3 standard jerry cans and 2 portable tanks between 20-30 litres each.  these appear to placed forward for weight distribution. 

This boat Cruisecraft Reef Raider had a tank size of around 120 litres - though as a retro fit it is not unusual to see that increased up to 170 litres.  Cruise craft - well made strong local sea boat 

https://www.etecownersgroup.com/post/well-just-buy-one-10382820?pid=1310505717

Click image for larger version - Name: 3.jpg, Views: 50, Size: 120.80 KB

cheers
stats 

DC

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Posts: 241
Reply with quote  #20 
I doubt any other 17 foot boat has done that trip, same with a lot of my trips in this vessel. I have never previously taken passengers along for the ride as I am well aware of the risks involved. I do it because I can and I can’t afford to do it otherwise.

Since I was 12 years old I’ve owned a large number of vessels, a few larger, mostly smaller. I have been operating a wide range of commercial vessels for the last 23 years. I wanted to go cruising at one stage so I purchased a small sailboat, refurbished it and set off. I taught myself how to sail properly and covered almost 5000nm including 2 trips to Cato Island/Wreck Reef, 200nm offshore. I sold the sailboat because I prefer fishing over sailing. I chose my current vessel because of its volume and the cabin shape that sheds water well.

The trip in question was an extremely calculated risk. When Graham expressed interest in coming, I made sure he had no illusions.

I only have VHF radio on board. I can still receive the coast station that far out but transmission would be limited to less than half that distance, unless conditions were right for radio wave ducting. The outer edge of the Great Barrier Reef is 50nm inshore of the seamount and there are a lot of vessels moving about. There are a number of Longliners that work offshore and many ships would pass within radio range.

I am very particular with my vessel and its equipment and ‘making the call to mummy’ is my last option. As with activating an EPIRB.

I carry a 4hp auxiliary outboard. This will at least provide a controlled drift if necessary. Considering prevailing winds and currents, I would likely end up back inside the reef some distance from my departure point but this would lessen the burden (and embarrassment) of an ocean rescue. I could then trailer the boat home.

I carry a couple of heavy duty tarps which could also be jury rigged for propulsion and extra shade. I have a comprehensive grab bag which includes hand held VHF and GPS.
DC

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Posts: 241
Reply with quote  #21 
I've added a short engine description and 2 more photos to the original post
DC

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Posts: 241
Reply with quote  #22 
My fuel tank holds 145 usable litres. There's 125L on deck.
jimh

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Reply with quote  #23 
DC--thanks for the additional information. I have to convert the volumes and distances to more familiar units.

145 + 125 = 270-liters = 71-gallons

180-liters and 222-nautical miles = 47-gallons and 255.5-statue-miles = 5.4-miles-per-gallon

That gives an ultimate range of 71-gallons x 5.4-miles/1-gallon = 385-miles

For the 255.5-trip you used about 255.5/385 = 66-percent of your fuel.

Without converting the units of volume and distance for this data, the figures wouldn't make any sense to me. I never use liters or nautical-miles for volume or distance.

The E-TEC G2 1.9-liter three-cylinder 115 H.O. engine and your boat combine to produce 5.4-MPG, and that seems quite good.

You wrote that the new engine improved the fuel economy compared to the legacy E-TEC in a ratio of 1.25:1 ("twentyfive percent'), so I can now calculate that the older E-TEC engine gave you about 5.4-MPG/1.25 = 4.3-MPG

I presume those figures are for a mix of engine speeds, that is, for the entire trip. In comparison, my 225-HP legacy E-TEC and my 24-foot boat produces a usual mixed-speed 3.0-MPG fuel economy. But that is for almost double the horsepower and double the weight.

So in summary, if I may, you really were saying, the new E-TEC G2 engine gets 5.4-MPG and the old E-TEC legacy engine got 4.3-MPG, but the reader had to perform quite a bit of math to get those figures.

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jimh

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Reply with quote  #24 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Statler
...in one of the posted photos there is a deck photo showing 3 standard jerry cans and 2 portable tanks between 20-30 litres each...


You might consider a second career as a photo-analyst with the CIA. Generally I rely on photographs having captions to explain to the viewer what they are seeing.

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jimh

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Reply with quote  #25 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DC
...I only have VHF radio on board. I can still receive the coast station that far out but transmission would be limited to less than half that distance, unless conditions were right for radio wave ducting.


Unless the coast station were transmitting at much higher power than your boat's transmitter, the radio path should be reciprocal, that is, if you can hear the other station, they should be able to hear you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DC
The outer edge of the Great Barrier Reef is 50nm inshore of the seamount and there are a lot of vessels moving about. There are a number of Longliners that work offshore and many ships would pass within radio range.


That is very helpful to know. If you did get into trouble, you likely could have made radio contact with the VHF radio to another boat nearby.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DC
I am very particular with my vessel and its equipment and ‘making the call to mummy’ is my last option. As with activating an EPIRB.


I now infer you had an EPIRB aboard. That is very wise. Again, thanks for the additional information.

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jimh

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Reply with quote  #26 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DC
...I sold the sailboat because I prefer fishing over sailing....


I am an ex-sailor, too. We gave up cruising Lake Huron in a 30-foot (9.2-meter) sloop for a trailerable cuddy-cabin outboard boat. Being able to trailer the boat gave us access to a much greater range of cruising grounds.

But no angling for me. I get the fish I consume at a local fishery on Lake Michigan, at about $15-per-lbs. I figure if I tried to catch them myself they'd cost about $300-per-lbs.

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Sunandwine

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Posts: 11
Reply with quote  #27 
What a distance, lm feeling brave at 10 miles out , engine a bit older at 2007
but still sweet 
20ft open 115 etec 
rickmcd53

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Posts: 2,491
Reply with quote  #28 
Jim, I don't think in liters, meters, or nautical miles either and have to do some conversions.
I have to remind myself that I'm having an American point of view and most of the rest of the world would have to convert our "miles per gallon" reports.

I also noticed my American view on hull designs. The Quintrex brand hulls look odd with their high freeboard and closed transoms. It appears that other countries are building more seaworthy boats in smaller, (more affordable) sizes while the U.S. designers send the message "buy a bigger boat".
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